Beverlyheels.com Beverlyheels.com
DISCREET SHIPPING. Order Online or Call 800.329.4420
Beverlyheels.com Beverlyheels.com
800.329.4420


Scan QR Code with Phone

Beverlyheels StyleFootwear: GoGo Boots

Footwear: GoGo Boots

Posted on Mon, Oct 23rd, 2017

The girl in white and the Go-go boots

Think 1960's, think sex, drugs and rock-n-roll. The year that saw the release of the iconic book "Sex and the Single Girl" also saw the emergence of many whacky fashion trends including the go-go boots.

The original go-go boots, as defined by French designer Andre Courreges in 1964, were white, low heeled and mid-calf in length. Sometimes called the Courreges boot, these would become go-go boots in future and would include knee-high, square-toed boots with block heels with variations including kitten heels and colors other than white.

Derived from the ancient French word "la gogue" meaning "joy, happiness", "gogo" is a French expression which means "in abundance or galore". The term "go-go dancer" first arrived in print in 1965. The boots have been named after the dance style.

Nancy Sinatra, the singer-daughter of celebrated singer actor Frank Sinatra was the queen of go-go boots. Her 1965 pop hit "These boots are meant for walking" sold just under four million copies. Photos and album covers from the 60's feature Sinatra wearing white go-go boots matching a white mini dress, or brown boots with a hip-hugging sweater or an ensemble of red boots with red mini dress. Soon the go-go boots were being designed in a way that could be easily reproduced for the mass market. It became an essential in young women's wardrobes in the 1970's.

Throughout the 60's, the chosen outfit to wear with go-go boots was the mini skirt. Today, the term "go-go boots" refers to just about any calf length boot, but with more and more retro clothing making a comeback, it's easier to find a pair that resembles the boots of the 70's.

Find your pair at beverlyheels.com



Please Log-In to post your comments



Content © 2020 Beverlyheels.com - Not for Redistribution